Raw and Real or Perfectly Polished?

typo flickr CC zapdelight
Image courtesy of Flickr CC user zapdelight

Hello Lovelies,

Everyday life has been getting in the way of my writing lately and it has been a while since I last posted, but I’m here now and hope to give you a little insight into my thoughts and views when it comes to my own writing.

You might have noticed that quite often, my blog posts are not perfectly polished, they contains typos, grammatical errors and silly spelling mistakes. There is a reason for this.

You see, my posts are meant to provide an insight into the inner workings of this writer’s mind. To give you all a glimpse of what I am thinking and feeling on the particular day/topic I am writing on. I want these posts to be real and sometimes quite raw in emotion and opinion, and I believe this is something which can be lost in the editing process. There is such a thing, in my opinion, as too much editing, especially when it comes to an opinion piece. Through the editing process we can start to censor ourselves as we strive towards the point of polished perfection.

Now, some of you might think that there’s no excuse for poor grammar or silly typos in a published piece of writing, and yes, that might be true. However this is the choice I have made in order to keep these posts as real as possible. I do, of course, read through my posts before hitting the ‘publish’ button, but I do not overly-edit them and a simple read-through is not going to catch all of those nasty little typos.

This doesn’t mean that I don’t or won’t edit my manuscript or that I fear that editing it will diminish the realness of the characters I have created, definitely not. Writing blog posts and writing a novel are two completely different things. When blogging I am trying to capture the sometimes chaotic and confused reality of a writer, who still has a day job and supports a family. The feelings, actions, thoughts etc. are already there and I am trying to provide my audience with a snapshot of my reality. However, when writing a novel, the feelings, actions and thoughts do not preexist. I, as the writer, am creating these and through a careful editing process, the world of these characters is further enhanced not diminished.

So there you have it.

My aim is that my blog posts are real and raw, with the occasional (OK, sometimes more than occasional) typo and error, but this is my preference, rather than having a perfectly polished, but void of “realness” post.

My manuscripts, on the other hand, will be getting a completely different treatment though.

So write, read, edit, whatever, but do it your way.

Enjoy,

KK

 

 

© Katherine A. Kovács and The Writer Within, (2013-2017). Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Katherine A. Kovács and The Writer Within with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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More Than Just Pleasantville

Hello Lovelies,

Last night I was watching the movie Pleasantville and it got me thinking about the importance of conveying emotions within each of our characters. Now of course this is not something new to me, but rather something that was reinforced by the watching of the movie.

In case you haven’t seen the movie, here’s a quick rundown of the plot. Basically, teenage siblings from the modern day, David and Jennifer, are transported into the 1950s television world of ‘Pleasantville’ into the lives of Bud and Mary Sue, where everything is well…. pleasant; pleasant weather, pleasant people with nothing but pleasant feelings doing pretty much the same thing day in and day out. The TV show that is depicted in the movie, is in black and white, so naturally when the two main characters are transported into that world, becoming the Pleasantville characters of Bud and Mary Sue, they also are in black and white.

 

Content of this clip remains the property of Warner Bros Studios

However, things start to change in the TV land of Pleasantville, as people begin to experience other things besides ‘pleasant’, the world starts to slowly fill with colour, one person, one flower, one door at a time.

There are many lessons to be learnt from the movie Pleasantville (such as those suggested here) however something which I took out of this movie was the importance of self-discovery and self-acceptance, allowing for the experience of all emotions.

But see? That’s just the point! It can’t stop at once, because it’s in you, and you can’t stop something that’s inside you. -Bud/David, Pleasantville

Sometimes, the world isn’t just pleasant. Sometimes it’s more, it can be amazing, exciting and exhilarating and sometimes is not pleasant at all it can be sad, lonely, dark and painful. The important thing though is that we allow ourselves to experience the world in all of it’s technicolor glory! Allow ourselves to feel happy, sad, excited, depressed, ecstatic, angry or even down right pissed off! The point is, not only is it important for our own lives to allow ourselves to experience all of these emotions when appropriate, it is also an important part of character development to create characters that experience a world that is more than just Pleasantville. In order to develop our characters we need to consider Bud’s words from the quote above and find out exactly what is it inside our characters that can’t be stopped? What is their emotional response to each complication in the plot? (Even the smallest complication that seems insignificant). We need to consider their life experiences and things that have shaped the person they are in the story we are trying to tell. Their background and history may not be important to the story, but it is something that is important for the writer in the development of each character.

Enjoy you week,

KK

© Katherine A. Kovacs and The Writer Within, (2013-2015). Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Katherine A. Kovacs and The Writer Within with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Exploring the Darkness

Hello Lovelies,

Welcome to this week’s post.

Since my last post I have been exploring my main character and delving deeper into the darkness of his past. I’ve found the more I delve into his past and his feelings towards the death of his parents, the more I am understanding him and what drives him. I am understanding his attachment and overly protective tendencies towards Rosie but I am also now questioning some of my planned plot developments, I have a feeling that one of the major events in the story is going to change slightly as a result of my exploration into my main character.

I guess an occupational hazard of writing is when you delve so deeply into a character, the thoughts feelings and actions of your character influence your own mood. As I have been exploring the darkness of my character so intensely this week, I have subconsciously been withdrawn and detached slightly in my own life, it wasn’t until I sat down to write today that I realised that it was happening. I think because we ‘writer types’ become so invested in our main characters that they truly become a part of us, therefore it is only natural that they influence our lives in some way. As I wade through the murky waters that are my character’s past and allow for his thoughts and feelings to be expressed, I am beginning to see the light that is now in his life in the form of his beloved Rosie. People say that love conquers all and overcomes all obstacles, whilst this may not be true in every instance, it certainly does help and in Thomas’ case, love has shown him that there is still light in the world, love has drawn him out of the darkness.

Today I have an excerpt of Thomas’ journal for you, this excerpt shows that he is beginning to explore the darkness of his past, one very small step at a time, so he is able to heal old wounds (sometimes self-inflicted), physically and emotionally.

Again, remember this is just the first draft and very raw material.

Enjoy,

KK

Image

I’m not ready to write about the darkest parts of my past, Rosie knows most things but in bits and pieces that she has pieced together or small parts I have confided in her. I think though, I am ready to write about my parents and what my life was before the darkness closed in.

I did not have the typical childhood of a child brought up in the midst of high society. My parents were very hands on, I did not have a nanny or a governess, I was their only child and they doted on me at every chance they had. I wasn’t overly spoiled by any means, I had no idea how wealthy our family was (and is), but I was loved. I still remember the warmth and comfort of my mother’s embrace and the playfulness of my father as we played chasing games, when he caught me (and he always did) he would tickle me until my stomach ached. I knew that my parents loved me, they showed me though every embrace, every word, every kiss goodnight. My grandmother used to always complain that if someone were to see the way my parents were with me, they would think we were simple commoners; I didn’t know what that meant until I was much older. In a way, perhaps we were commoners, my parents enjoyed the simpler life and my mother was not from a wealthy family, something which I feel my grandmother always held against her. My parents loathed the times when the expectations of society would take them away and prevent them from spending time with me. I had the perfect childhood, until they became sick, it was then that the darkness began to creep in. I wasn’t even allowed to see them, I didn’t get to say goodbye, and I didn’t get to tell them how much I loved them. They now say it was an epidemic, Spanish Influenza infected so many people, mostly people who were from poorer families. My grandmother blames my mother’s family for the loss of her son and I think some in some way her animosity towards Rosie is drawn from her feelings towards my own mother and the loss of her son. After they died, I remember feeling angry and lost, all normal feelings for one who is grieving the loss of a loved one, feelings that would eventually subside, so I was told… but they didn’t. These feelings continued to grow until they all but consumed me. The darkness closed in and I thought I would never see light again, until one day… there she was… my light, my Rosie. 

© Katherine A. Kovacs and The Writer Within, (2013-2015). Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Katherine A. Kovacs and The Writer Within with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.